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Strong is the New Pretty: A Celebration of Girls Being Themselves
Strong is the New Pretty: A Celebration of Girls Being Themselves
Strong is the New Pretty: A Celebration of Girls Being Themselves
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Strong is the New Pretty: A Celebration of Girls Being Themselves

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Kate T. Parker
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$15.00
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$15.00
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Made in Atlanta, Georgia. Printed in China.

Made by Kate T. Parker.

Made of 175 memorable photographs featuring the strength and spirit of girls being 100% themselves.

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Kate T. Parker is a mother, wife, former collegiate soccer player, Ironman, and professional photographer who shoots both fine art projects and commercial work for clients across North America.  Kate has also launched a philanthropic arm of Strong Is the New Pretty, partnering with organizations that invest in girls’ health and education. When she’s not photographing, she can be found coaching her daughters’ soccer teams. She lives with her family in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Real beauty isn't about being a certain size, acting a certain way, wearing the right clothes, or having your hair done (or even brushed). Real beauty is about being your authentic self and owning it. Strong Is the New Pretty conveys a powerful message for every girl, for every mother and father of a girl, for every coach and mentor and teacher, for everyone in the village that it takes to raise a strong and self-confident person.

*These books were obtained as a result of publisher overstock. That is when publishers estimate demand, both past sales and future sales projections, to determine the size of a print run. When they get it wrong and print more books than readers are willing to buy, the result is excess inventory. Overstock books that don’t sell at trade shows and books that retailers return then become remainder titles that publishers then sell to bargain book wholesalers. Book publishers typically mark the page edges of reminders with a random streak, dot or a symbol to guard against full-price refund claims.